Weekly Cyber Risk Roundup: WannaCry Updates and Sensitive Leaks Continue

WannaCry remained as the week’s top trending cybercrime target as organizations continued to deal with the fallout from being infected and researchers uncovered more information on the ransomware. On Friday, a Kaspersky Lab researcher tweeted that machines running Windows 7 were the most impacted by WannaCry, accounting for more than 97 percent of total infections observed by the firm. Other firms observed Windows 7 infection rates as low as 67 percent; however, both numbers contradict the initial focus on outdated systems such as Windows XP, which Kaspersky dismissed as having an “insignificant” number of infections.

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As Reuters reported, computers running older versions such as Windows XP were individually vulnerable to attack, but they appear incapable of spreading infections and played a far smaller role in last week’s attack.

In addition, the past week saw a variety of manufacturers issue warnings about WannaCry potentially impacting their products. Siemens warned customers that some of its Healthineers products may be affected by the vulnerabilities exploited by WannaCry, and the Health Information Trust Alliance said that medical devices manufactured by Bayer were also vulnerable. Medical device manufacturer Becton, Dickinson and Company as well as Swiss robotics and automation firm Rockwell Automation and ABB also issued more general WannaCry advisories to their customers.

It is also worth noting that a small portion of WannaCry infections have been successfully decrypted. A French security researcher discovered a flaw in the WannaCry ransomware that allowed him to successfully decrypt several Windows XP computers using a tool called “WannaKey,” and a separate pair of French researchers then adapted the decryption tool to work for Windows 7 computers with a tool called “WannaKiwi.” If users left their computer untouched after the infection and did not reboot, they may be able to access parts of the memory and regenerate a key; however, the researcher warned it won’t work every time even in that situation.

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Other trending cybercrime events from the week include:

  • Another large point-of-sale breach: A POS breach at Brooks Brothers locations lasted for more than a year and affected more than 300 locations, the company announced. Customers who made purchases at approximately 320 different Brooks Brothers and Brooks Brothers Outlet retail locations in the U.S. and Puerto Rico between April 4, 2016 and March 1, 2017, may have had their payment card data stolen. An unauthorized individual was able to gain access to and install POS malware on the stores’ POS systems, the company said. Online purchases were not impacted.
  • Hollywood targeted by extortionists: The upcoming Pirates of the Caribbean movie has been stolen by hackers who demanded “an enormous” amount of money in ransom to not release the movie. The Hollywood Reporter reported that talent agencies UTA, ICM, and WME have been targeted by hackers attempting to steal sensitive information, and the attacks are so common that their frequency has overwhelmed the FBI’s Los Angeles field office. At least one unnamed Hollywood company has paid a ransom. In addition, TheDarkOverlord said that more of the group’s previously stolen shows from Larson Studios will be released soon since “none of the affected parties has paid the ransom.”
  • Third-party breach leads to source code theft: The app maker Panic said the source code for several of its apps was stolen due to downloading a malware-infested version of HandBrake during a three-day window when that company was compromised and serving up a Trojanized update to its users. The attacker then sent an email demanding a large bitcoin ransom to prevent the release of the source code, but Panic did not pay that ransom. The company is warning its users to beware of any unofficial versions of their apps, as they will likely be versions using the company’s old code but with malware added.
  • Other notable cybercrime news: Zomato announced that 17 million user records were compromised by a grey-hat hacker. The font sharing website DaFont was hacked and the usernames, email addresses, and hashed passwords of 699,464 user accounts were stolen. Bell Canada said that a hacker managed to access the email addresses of approximately 1.9 million customers, and 1,700 customers also had their names and phone numbers accessed. The University of New Mexico Foundation is notifying approximately 23,000 donors, annuitants, foundation employees, and vendors that their personal and financial information may have been compromised. The Clinton County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Walnut Place announced they were the victims of ransomware attacks. The National University of Singapore and the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore were targeted by sophisticated hackers who broke into the school’s IT systems in an attempt to steal sensitive government and research data. A former employee of Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates has been charged with selling the information of more than 150 patients to an identity thief for $10 each. United Airlines said that information regarding its flight deck access security procedures “may have been compromised” and that “some cockpit door access information may have been made public.” However, the possible public release of the security procedures was not due to a hack or data breach, CBS News reported.

SurfWatch Labs collected data on many different companies tied to cybercrime over the past week. Some of those “newly seen” targets, meaning they either appeared in SurfWatch Labs’ data for the first time or else reappeared after being absent for several weeks, are shown in the chart below.

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Cyber Risk Trends From the Past Week

2017-05-19_RiskScoresAs WannaCry continues to dominate cybercrime news, the past week saw even more leaks of government-created malware and promises of additional leaks to come in the future. WikiLeaks has continued to dump files allegedly stolen from the CIA, and TheShadowBrokers group has announced a new monthly service providing various data dumps and exploits to its customers.

WikiLeaks has dumped stolen CIA documents every Friday for the past eight weeks, and the two most recent dumps include:

  • AfterMidnight, which is a malware framework that “allows operators to dynamically load and execute malware payloads on a target machine” and “disguises as a self-persisting Windows Service DLL.”
  • Assassin, which is a malware framework similar to AfterMidnight that “is an automated implant that provides a simple collection platform on remote computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system.”
  • Athena, which “provides remote beacon and loader capabilities on target computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (from Windows XP to Windows 10).”

In addition to the continuing leaks of sensitive CIA material from WikiLeaks, TheShadowBrokers is using the attention around WannaCry to promote a monthly exploit service that it is launching in June. TheShadowBrokers have previously dumped stolen exploits allegedly developed by the NSA, including the EternalBlue exploit recently leveraged by WannaCry.  “TheShadowBrokers Data Dump of the Month” service provides subscribers with various cybercrime tools and data for a monthly fee. According to TheShadowBrokers rambling blog post, these monthly dumps could include:

  • web browser, router, and handset exploits and tools
  • select items from newer Ops Disks, including newer exploits for Windows 10
  • compromised network data from more SWIFT providers and central banks
  • compromised network data from Russian, Chinese, Iranian, or North Korean nukes and missile programs

The group said that more details will be announced in June. It’s unclear if the group has more sensitive data and exploits they’re willing to publish, or if they are using their fifteen minutes of WannaCry fame in an attempt to generate some income. Either way, WannaCry serves as a reminder that organizations need to monitor the leak of government tools as they can cause serious damage when they fall into the wrong hands.

Author: Jeff Peters

SurfWatch Labs editor and host of SurfWatch Labs Cyber Chat podcast. Focused on using threat intelligence and data visualization in order to bring cybercrime to life and help make organizations safer.

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